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Toronto Subway Station Challenge: Answers Revealed



A few days ago, we challenged readers to identify adjacent two subway stations on the system “whose names have no letters in common.” So, stations like “High Park” and “Keele” were not correct answers, as the two stations share the letter “K”.

We got a number of correct responses. Two station sets fit the bill ideally, while a third also fits, if you make some assumptions and caveats. Adam Polisak was the first to name all three sets, which were:

College and Dundas
Old Mill and Jane
Bay and St. George

Eliot Rossi was the first to identify which of the three was the dodgy one, but the correspondent Future Redstone Craft was the first to identify why: Bay and St. George only work if you’re going by the letters on the station walls themselves and aren’t assuming that the official name of St. George station is “SAINT George” (the “A” in Saint disqualifies). Billy Cabic also noted that you are assuming that the letters to “YORKVILLE” found on Bay station’s walls aren’t to be used.

However, the correspondent Fafa Flunkie made a good argument for an answer we hadn’t considered: “Museum-Bay”. One could argue that these stations were adjacent during the three months following the opening of the Bloor-Danforth subway when it was interlined with the Yonge-University subway, and Woodbine trains bound from downtown stopped at Museum station and then travelled to Lower Bay. In this case, you don’t even need to make the “Yorkville” caveat.

Thanks to everyone who participated. We hope you enjoyed this challenge