The Second Generation: The CC&F's and the Marmon-Herringtons (1947-1972)

Text by James Bow.

When the Second World War ended, the TTC were ready to consider running trolley coaches on the streets of Toronto again. Many North American cities were opting for trolley buses at this time. Most were using them to replace their aging streetcar fleets. With tracks desperately in need of repair along with the streetcars themselves, trolley buses were seen as a cheaper alternative, which might still offer the advantages of streetcar service.

The TTC did not consider using trolley buses to replace its entire streetcar fleet. Toronto's streetcars were generally in good enough condition, and were providing too useful a service to easily replace. However, certain lighter routes in the system needed repairing or expanding, and the trolley bus could be a good alternative for these routes. To inaugurate service on the Lansdowne, Annette and Ossington routes, the TTC turned to the Canadian Car & Foundry factory in Fort William (now part of Thunder Bay), Ontario. Between 1947 and 1948, they provided the TTC with 85 new vehicles. The initial T-44 models were 35'7" long and could seat 44 passengers.

In 1953 the TTC prepared to expand the trolley bus network, with new services set to start on the Nortown and Yonge routes in March 1954. As a result, the TTC ordered another 40 buses from CC&F. The T-48A model was longer than its older counterparts, at 38'9", and it could seat 48 passengers instead of 44. These were the last new trolley buses purchased by the TTC. Interest in trolley buses was fading throughout North America, and CC&F considered the market to be "saturated". The TTC purchased 15 TC48 model Marmon-Herrington trolley buses from Cincinnati. Until the Western Flyers, these were the longest buses in the system, at 39'3", and could seat 48 passengers. They were the second-lightest buses on the system as well, although externally they were similar to their CC&F cousins.

In 1959, the TTC would acquire 5 CC&F T-48A's from the abandoned eight-year-old system in Ottawa and, in 1963, the TTC purchased an additional 8 TC44 Marmon-Herringtons from Cleveland. These covered extensions to the Ossington and Annette trolley bus lines.

By the mid 1960s, the buses were nearing the end of their lifespans in some respects. With the opening of the Bloor-Danforth subway and the associated restructuring of the TTC's surface network, the TTC reviewed its position regarding the trolley buses. Deciding to maintain trolley bus service for the foreseeable future, the TTC set about on a rebuilding program that could extend the lives of its fleet. A deal with Western Flyer was set up. The CC&F coaches would be rebuilt. As for the 23 Marmon-Herringtons, the TTC and Western Flyer would rebuild these too, but the non-standard components would be replaced using parts salvaged from other CC&F vehicles. The TTC made its last purchase of Canadian Car & Foundry trolley coaches in the early 1970s when it obtained 23 T-44 and T-44A models from abandoned systems in Cornwall and Halifax. These 23 coaches were used as companion parts.

Principal Specifications

Fleet Class

T1, T2 & T3

T4

T5

T6

T7

Fleet Numbers

9000-9049
9050-9074
9075-9084

9085-9124

9125-9139

9140-9144

9145-9152

Builder

Canadian Car & Foundry

Canadian Car & Foundry

Marmon - Herrington

Canadian Car & Foundry

Marmon - Herrington

Model

T44

T48A

TC48

T48A

TC44

Year Built (Leased)

1947-8

1953

1948 (1953 Cincinnati)

1951 (1959 Ottawa)

1947 (1963 Cleveland)

Length

35' 7" (10.85 m)

38' 9.5" (11.82 m)

39' 3" (11.96 m)

38' 9.5" (11.82 m)

36' 8" (11.18 m)

Width

8' 6" (2.59 m)

8' 6" (2.59 m)

8' 6" (2.59 m)

8' 6" (2.59 m)

8' 6" (2.59 m)

Height

9' 7" (2.92 m)

9' 9.75" (2.99 m)

9' 5" (2.87 m)

9' 9.75" (2.99 m)

9' 5" (2.87 m)

Wheelbase

20' 9" (6.32 m)

20' 7" (6.27 m)

22' 0" (6.71 m)

20' 7" (6.27 m)

19' 7" (5.97 m)

Seating

44

48

48

48

38

Weights - Normal (W1)

18510 lb (8400 kg)

19500 lb (8850 kg)

18000 lb (8160 kg)

19500 lb (8850 kg)

17700 lb (8030 kg)

Weights -- Normal (Service) (W4)

29460 lb (13360 kg)
(72)

31350 lb (14220 kg)
(78)

31050 lb (14080 kg)
(86)

31350 lb (14220 kg)
(78)

29250 lb (13270 kg)
(76)

Weights -- Normal (Crush) (W5)

31710 lb (14380 kg)
(87)

33750 lb (15310 kg)
(94)

32850 lb (14900 kg)
(98)

33750 lb (15310 kg)
(94)

32250 lb (14630 kg)
(96)


The Second Generation Trolley Buses Image Archive


References

  • Filey, Mike, The TTC Story: The First Seventy-Five Years, Dundurn Press, Toronto (Ontario) 1996.
  • Scrimgeour, Pat and Scott Haskill., 'Toronto Trolley Coaches Stored', Rail and Transit, January 1992, p3-4, The Upper Canada Railway Society, Toronto (Ontario).
  • Corley, Ray F., Trolley Coach CC&F and Flyer Coaches, The Toronto Transit Commission, Toronto (Ontario), January 1987.

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This page is an article within the Trolley Bus division of Transit Toronto articles.

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